Reader’s Contest – Troublefixer of the week – Windows Login Error – The local policy of this system does not permit you to logon interactively

Trouble:

 

Hello readers, in continuation to our contest post, this is another post for tickling your geeky skills. The rules are same as mentioned in previous contest posts.

 

The contest question of this week is:

On windows login the error is displayed saying –

“The local policy of this system does not permit you to logon interactively” Why this message and how to fix it?

     Windows-Login-error

Hint :This kind of error is generally observed on computers which login on a domain on a network using windows active directory feature.

 

Submit the solution through comment to the post.

 

Updated 7th August 2008. The most complete fix is provided by Nishit from Gadget Information blog. Refer to his comment below.

Comments

  1. The problem can be solved by the following method

    Try and login in the safe mode and then rename the wpa.dbl file on the computer and then restart the computer and the computer will promnpt for the activation please activate the computer using the phone activation
    NOte: Do not use online activation

    Once the computer accepts the key or the activation computer will allow you to login on the computer without any problem

    Other simple resolution will be performing a repair installation but while performing a repair installation the computer wil be out of domain and needs to be reconfigured for the domain settings

    Thanks and regards

    Amit mehta

  2. Problem

    A user tries to log on to a Windows machine and receives the error message “The local policy of this system does not permit you to log on interactively.” This can happen in a number of scenarios, and the way to resolve the issue depends on the cause of the problem.
    Solution A

    If the Local Security Policy is set to disallow local logons to Everyone, then the error message will pop up for any user who tries to log on, including an administrator. This can be fixed in a couple of ways:

    1. You can use the resource kit tool, Ntrights.exe(http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;EN-US;279664), to change the local logon rights. For example, you could run this command: ntrights -m \\ProblemComputer -u Administrator +r SeInteractiveLogonRight.
    2. You can open a command prompt from another computer on the same network, issue the command Net use x: \\ProblemComputer\C$ /u:Administrator, and then change to the directory %SystemRoot%\Security\Database. Rename Secedit.sdb to Secedit.old_sdb and copy a working version of a Secedit.sdb file from another computer running the same operating system (for example, Windows 2000 Professional).

    Solution B

    In Active Directory, if a Group Policy is set to Deny Logon Locally, users will encounter this error. In order to mitigate the problem, an administrator will need to change the policy, as explained in this tip.
    Solution C

    If this error message pops up while a user is trying to connect via Remote Desktop or a Terminal Services connection, the administrator will need to take a different set of actions. For a Remote Desktop connection, Microsoft Knowledge Base Article 289289 explains how to overcome this error.

    For Terminal Services clients, this error message could be caused by Terminal Services being installed on a domain controller; this tip explains what needs to be done in that case. For Windows NT Server 4.0 Terminal Server Edition, there could be a different problem, and Microsoft Knowledge Base Article 186529 shows what can be done to resolve the issue.

  3. If the Local Security Policy is set to disallow local logons to Everyone, then the error message will pop up for any user who tries to log on, including an administrator. This can be fixed in a couple of ways:

    1. You can use the resource kit tool, Ntrights.exe, to change the local logon rights. For example, you could run this command: ntrights -m \\ProblemComputer -u Administrator +r SeInteractiveLogonRight.
    2. You can open a command prompt from another computer on the same network, issue the command Net use x: \\ProblemComputer\C$ /u:Administrator, and then change to the directory %SystemRoot%\Security\Database. Rename Secedit.sdb to Secedit.old_sdb and copy a working version of a Secedit.sdb file from another computer running the same operating system (for example, Windows 2000 Professional).

  4. The easiest way to fix this issue is to add the user that is trying to logon to one of the groups that has explicit logon rights or add them individually. Navigate to Start/Run/ gpedit.msc — Local Computer Policy/Computer Configuration/Windows Settings/Security Settings/Local Policies/User Rights Assignments — Select the Policy for Log on Locally. Add the user or group accordingly.

  5. I thank you for these suggestions, but I have this problem on Windows XP and can’t find a solution. My admin account won’t let me log on and gives this error. I’ve tried doing a repair installation, but it still fails my password there. I tried Safe Mode w/ Command prompt, but it still sends me to the login screen. I never set a password for the admin account. I don’t have this machine networked with any other machine I own – it’s just it and the internet. I’m totally stuck. Does anyone have a suggestion for how to fix on Windows XP? This happened after installing one of Microsoft’s security updates.

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